"We want the robot to communicate using the cues that people already recognise, said AJung. This is key to interacting with a robot in a safe and friendly manner."
New York, April 12 - You must have seen in movies robots that act and behave like human beings. That's going to happen in real life.

Researchers are programming robots to communicate with people using human-like body language and cues.

Researchers at the University of British Columbia enlisted the help of a human-friendly robot named Charlie to study the simple task of handing an object to a person.

We hand things to other people multiple times a day and we do it seamlessly, said AJung Moon, a PhD student in the university's department of mechanical engineering.

Getting this to work between a robot and a person is really important if we want robots to be helpful in fetching us things in our homes or at work.

Past research has shown that people have difficulty figuring out when to reach out and take an object from a robot because robots fail to provide appropriate nonverbal cues.

AJung and her colleagues studied what people do with their heads, necks and eyes when they hand water bottles to one another.

They then tested three variations of this interaction with Charlie and the 102 study participants.

Programming the robot to use eye gaze as a nonverbal cue made the handover more fluid.

Researchers found that people reached out to take the water bottle sooner in scenarios where the robot moved its head to look at the area where it would hand over the water bottle or looked to the handover location and then up at the person to make eye contact.

We want the robot to communicate using the cues that people already recognise, said AJung. This is key to interacting with a robot in a safe and friendly manner.

The paper based on the work was declared the best paper at this year's International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction held in in Bielefeld, Germany.


comments powered by Disqus
Read more on:
 NEW YORK (26931 views)
 BEST (24411 views)
 RESEARCH (16031 views)
 GERMAN (11581 views)
 COLUMBIA (5926 views)
 EADS (4121 views)
 NATIONAL CONFERENCE (3550 views)
 ALREADY (3531 views)
 BRITISH COLUMBIA (3191 views)
 CENA (1991 views)
 UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA (1721 views)
 BIELEFELD (1126 views)
 PHD (1031 views)
 MECHANICAL ENGINEERING (541 views)
 

PERMALINK

http://www.nerve.in/news:2535002322744
You can quote the permanent link above for a direct link to the story. We do not archive or expire our news stories.


STORY OPTIONS
  Email this story to a friend
  XML feed for Americas


 
COPYRIGHTS INFORMATION
All rights reserved for news content. Reproduction, storage or redistribution of Nerve content and articles in any medium is strictly prohibited.
Contact Nerve Staff for any feedback, corrections and omissions in news stories.
 

All rights reserved for the news content. Reproduction, storage or redistribution of Nerve content and articles in any medium is strictly prohibited.