"The American-made movie triggered violent demonstrations across Pakistan which left more than 20 people dead."
Islamabad, April 21 - Pakistan's Senate Standing Committee on Human Rights approved a resolution Monday to lift a ban on video-sharing website Youtube, a media report said.

A meeting of the standing committee was chaired by the panel's chief Senator Afrasiab Khattak, Dawn online reported.

YouTube was first banned in Pakistan Feb 22, 2008, by the Pakistan Telecommunication Authority - because of the number of non-Islamic objectionable videos.

The ban was lifted Feb 26, 2008, after the website removed the objectionable content from its servers at the request of the government.

The video-sharing website was banned for the second time in a bid to contain blasphemous material, but was eventually the ban was lifted after removal of the contents May 27, 2010.

The PTA blocked YouTube for the third time after the website did not remove the trailer the film Innocence of Muslims, which ostensibly insulted Islam.

The American-made movie triggered violent demonstrations across Pakistan which left more than 20 people dead.

YouTube is also banned in other Islamic countries like Turkey, Iran, Sudan and Tajikistan.


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