"Now, the scientists are working to adapt Neurogrid for controlling prosthetic limbs for paralysed people."
New York, May 4 - Distressed at the slow speed of your personal computer? Here comes a microchip that would give your PC a speed that is 9,000 faster than an average one.

Modelled on the human brain, Neurogrid chip can simulate 1 million neurons and billions of synapses or brain connections.

That is a vast improvement over previous brain simulations but still only a fraction of the roughly 80 billion neurons in the human brain, researchers said.

From a pure energy perspective, the brain is hard to match. Not only are personal computers slower, they take 40,000 times more power than the brain to run, said Kwabena Boahen, a bio-engineer at Stanford University whose brainchild the chip is.

Neurogrid has of 16 custom-designed Neurocore chips in a device the size of an iPad.

This can open up windows into understanding the human brain and developing new forms of computing patterned after brain circuits.

Now, the scientists are working to adapt Neurogrid for controlling prosthetic limbs for paralysed people.

The chip can translate brain signals into movements of the limb, without overheating the brain, media reports said.


comments powered by Disqus
Read more on:
 NEW YORK (26931 views)
 WHO (19101 views)
 RESEARCH (16031 views)
 SCIENTISTS (13481 views)
 BRAIN (11091 views)
 STRESS (6841 views)
 RTS (6171 views)
 MIC (6001 views)
 MILLION (6011 views)
 CHE (5781 views)
 STANFORD (3981 views)
 SPEED (3101 views)
 NEURONS (2908 views)
 UNDERSTAND (2661 views)
 MICROCHIP (1692 views)
 STANFOR (1464 views)
 THE BRAIN (51 views)
 

PERMALINK

http://www.nerve.in/news:2535002371674
You can quote the permanent link above for a direct link to the story. We do not archive or expire our news stories.


STORY OPTIONS
  Email this story to a friend
  XML feed for Americas


 
COPYRIGHTS INFORMATION
All rights reserved for news content. Reproduction, storage or redistribution of Nerve content and articles in any medium is strictly prohibited.
Contact Nerve Staff for any feedback, corrections and omissions in news stories.
 

All rights reserved for the news content. Reproduction, storage or redistribution of Nerve content and articles in any medium is strictly prohibited.