"When an average person thinks of a reptile or a lizard, they probably don't think of something that's really active and intelligent and responsive and inquisitive. But they really are, Jim Breheny, director of the Bronx Zoo, was quoted as saying."
New York, May 25 - Having a date with the world's largest lizard on earth has just become a possibility.

Komodo dragons, known for their size and deadly bite, are now on display at the Bronx Zoo in New York after more than 50 years. The last Komodo dragon at the Bronx Zoo died in 1959.

At five-foot long and about 13.6 kg each, the three Komodos are still relatively small but will grow much bigger.

Male Komodos can grow to nine-foot long and 136 kg, the New York Times reported.

The dragons eat large animals, including deer, pigs and even water buffaloes. They are, however, fed rats and mice at the zoo.

Their bites can be toxic and they can trail prey for several days before finishing them off.

Komodo dragons are native to Indonesia where they are known as aggressive hunters.

According to zoo officials, the dinosaur-like creatures will inspire children's imaginations and teach them about conservation efforts for the vulnerable species.

When an average person thinks of a reptile or a lizard, they probably don't think of something that's really active and intelligent and responsive and inquisitive. But they really are, Jim Breheny, director of the Bronx Zoo, was quoted as saying.

There are at least 2,500 Komodo dragons in the wild and more than 100 at zoos in north America.


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