"The more than 32,000 known species of fish far outweigh the diversity of all other vertebrates combined, but very little public concern - which is so important to inform policy - is ever noted about fish welfare issues, the researcher contended."
Melbourne, June - Contrary to popular belief that fish are dumb and cannot feel pain, a new research says the primary senses of fish are just as good and, in many cases, better than those of humans.

Fish have very good memories, live in complex social communities where they keep track of individuals and can learn from one another, wrote Culum Brown from Macquarie University in Australia in a review article.

Fish even recognise themselves and others.

They also cooperate with one another and show signs of Machiavellian intelligence such as cooperation and reconciliation.

They build complex structures, are capable of using tools, and use the same methods for keeping track of quantities as humans do, the study noted.

The extensive evidence of fish behavioural and cognitive sophistication and pain perception suggests that best practice would be to lend fish the same level of protection as any other vertebrate, added Brown, who reviewed bony fish for the study.

The more than 32,000 known species of fish far outweigh the diversity of all other vertebrates combined, but very little public concern - which is so important to inform policy - is ever noted about fish welfare issues, the researcher contended.

The study appeared in the journal Animal Cognition.


comments powered by Disqus
Read more on:
 

PERMALINK

http://www.nerve.in/news:2535002382113
You can quote the permanent link above for a direct link to the story. We do not archive or expire our news stories.


STORY OPTIONS
  Email this story to a friend
  XML feed for Europe


 
COPYRIGHTS INFORMATION
All rights reserved for news content. Reproduction, storage or redistribution of Nerve content and articles in any medium is strictly prohibited.
Contact Nerve Staff for any feedback, corrections and omissions in news stories.
 

All rights reserved for the news content. Reproduction, storage or redistribution of Nerve content and articles in any medium is strictly prohibited.